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Louis Vuitton closes fashion month with dramatic time-travelling spectacle

As the French luxury house paid homage to fashion of centuries past, a 200-person choir dressed in period costumes provided a ghostly backdrop for the show.

Louis Vuitton closes fashion month with dramatic time-travelling spectacle

A choir consisting of 200 singers dressed in period costumes ranging from the 15th century to the 1950s look on as the Louis Vuitton Autumn/Winter 2020 collection was revealed. (Photo: Louis Vuitton)

The Louvre may have been closed due to staff concerns on the coronavirus, but on Tuesday (March 3), the historic museum reopened its doors for Louis Vuitton’s fall collection runway show, the last of Paris Fashion Week.

The show was a dramatic spectacle right from the start. Before the models took to the runway, a five-storey living backdrop was revealed, featuring a 200-person choir dressed in period costumes ranging from the 15th century to the 1950s. The choir’s wardrobe was the work of Oscar-winning costume designer Milena Canonero, known for his work on A Clockwork Orange, The Shining and The Grand Budapest Hotel.

The choir also performed original music composed by Woodkid and Bryce Dessner. (Photo: Louis Vuitton)

This idea of time translated on the runway too, as Nicolas Ghesquiere, Louis Vuitton Women’s artistic director presented a collection that juxtaposed different eras in fashion history. With Time Clash as the theme, petticoats were paired with motocross jackets, and Victorian style ruffled skirts were matched with pin-stripe blazers.

The collection was a clash of styles, unexpected pairings and subverted functions. (Photo: Louis Vuitton)

“I wanted different eras to be confronted with another one, our own. All of these 'pasts', embodied by a gallery of personalities in period dress, converge in our present. We are all together, looking at a collection that itself recounts a living, perennial, stylistic clash – and everything we can do with clothes by mixing and free-associating them,” Ghesquiere shared.

Accessories sent down the runway included the Keepall, a pure, vintage piece that acquired a beautiful patina over time now customised with a new strap, amidst small satchels, mini-totes and little minaudieres. Shoes illustrated a very free rein: Revisited boots and metal cap-toe pumps that evoke wheel rims on a customised car.

“I wanted different eras to be confronted with another one, our own. All of these 'pasts', embodied by a gallery of personalities in period dress, converge in our present." – Nicolas Ghesquiere

Evident from Ghesquiere’s shows in the past years, Vuitton is not one to shy away from extravagance. As Paris wrestled with coronavirus fears that sparked the cancelling of several shows, it was business as usual for Vuitton, which brought to a close what was a tumultuous fashion month on a dramatic note.

See some of the looks below.

Source: CNA/st(ds)

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